Their similarities were keen enough to define an archetype of the Appalachian writer at mid-20th century. Their differences were such as to make each a singular talent. Jesse Stuart, James Still, and George Scarbrough knew one another and admired each other’s work. All possessed shared experiences of growing up onContinue Reading

1. You and I lived nowhere by the river among the frogs, mushrooms, and flowers that flourished beside the sidewalks of our neighborhood. In the light of moon against the southern trees blowing in wind from the west, Your phone and my face glowed as we talked about what weContinue Reading

— From Death, Child, & Love: Poems 1980-2000 Last night while trimming our Christmas tree my son pointed out how I’d not written many poems lately to which I replied, “It’s true. But sometimes life is more prose than poetry. Do you understand?” A stupid question considering what he’d justContinue Reading

Amber Albritton is a creative writing student at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville who is currently investigating MFA programs throughout the country. She is a former Editor of Pellissippi State’s Imaginary Gardens Literary & Arts Review. Her poetry has been published in Phoenix Magazine. Her poem, “Privilege of Witness,” shinesContinue Reading

INTRODUCTION In 2013, Delonda Anderson conducted an interview with David Madden, published in Pellissippi State Community College’s Imaginary Gardens Literary and Arts Review. The following is Part I of that interview, with a tweaked introduction that also accredits work he has accomplished since then. On a frosty winter day, oneContinue Reading

Asthma and allergic diseases increased after children moved from free range outdoor activities to sanitized indoor playrooms and virtual playgrounds. According to the “hygiene hypothesis,” early exposure to germs and allergens is required to develop a robust immune system. As a “Mr. Mom” who prefers bike pedaling to pushing aContinue Reading

Its own metaphor for ineradicable nuisance, it plays at the mind’s edges, encroaching in the dullest greens, doffing the hat of a rude guest, last to leave the party. In some distant country it could be haiku climbing the walls in search of obscure interpretations, its tendrils reaching for meaningContinue Reading